Semantic searching without the semantic web?

Jon Udell writes about how IBM are developing techniques to pour “through unstructured text looking for named entities (people, places, companies, or products, for example) and relationships among them”, thus allowing machine analysis of text without requiring people to tag their work with semantic markup.

Mmm, the semantic web sans metacrap. Delicious. I’ll take two.

Technorati to be bought?

Rumour has it that Technorati‘s about to get snapped up by ‘a large search engine company’. Last time I blogged a rumour like this, it turned out to be true, but I can’t winkle even a single bit of data (neither a 0 nor a 1) out of my contacts at Technorati. Pfft. Trust me to hang out with such honourable people.

Last.fm relaunch site – with tags

The guys over at Last.fm have have finally merged the Last.fm music playlist sharing and internet radio site with their Audioscrobbler.com site, which served the plugin that you need to make Last.fm work (fyi: my page). I spoke to them about that before Christmas, but sadly didn’t get the chance to work with them. What’s really cool about the new redesign is that they’ve added tags to the mix, so you can forget about all that horrible music taxonomy stuff and just tag stuff however you like. Plus there seem to be a lot more in the way of charts now, for the statistically obsessed. Good work, guys.

Blogs take a shine to Moore’s Law

Michael S Malone writes:

Is there a Moore’s Law of the Blogosphere?

The reason for asking that question is the announcement this week by blog tracker Technorati […], in its annual State of the Blogosphere report that the number of blogs in the world has jumped from 7.5 million in March to 14.2 million today.

In other words, in appears the blogosphere is doubling in size every five months. Or even more staggering — a new blog is being created out there somewhere every second.

Whenever you hear the word “doubling” related to anything high tech, the first thing that comes to mind is the Law of Laws in the digital world: Moore’s Law of Semiconductors.

If Moore’s Law holds true for blogs, in three years we’ll have 2,000 million blogs. And I bet people will still be talking about ‘bloggers’ as if we are al the same.