Kevin

Journalism and innovation: “Never outsource your future”

 Piechota quotes Clayton Christensen, the esteemed chronicler of corporate change, saying: “Never outsource the future.” Ken Doctor does a great summary of a report by Grzegorz Piechota for the INMA. I met Grzegorz Piechota in Prague years ago now, probably 2007. We were both presenting at a small workshop for journalists hosted by the Transitions Online. Rather than doing a full-blown summary of a… Read more →

"Clay making a point" Photo by Joi Ito

Peak Content: When the Attention Economy bubble bursts

Never have we had so much choice in terms of news, information, music and entertainment. The democratisation of production brought by digital technology has made it easier than ever for people to create content, but it has also made it more difficult than ever to get paid to create it. This cannot last.

Which newspapers will survive?

Which newspapers will survive?

In a recent piece for The Media Briefing in the UK, I ask the question about which newspapers will survive. It is doubtless that newspapers are under pressure right now, but after nearly two years managing a group of small newspapers for Gannett, I realised that there are actually some newspapers that have a real fighting chance to survive. What things do they have in common?

What do we do less of, what do we more of?

My good friend Steve Yelvington highlighted this great post by John E. McIntyre at the Baltimore Sun: More more with less. He was commenting on the move by the Boston Globe to create a new class of multi-platform editors and the response that it had in the industry. The idea of doing more with less or less with less is… Read more →

Saving local journalism with vision

Tom Grubisich of hyperlocal news analysis site, Street Fight Mag, says that to save local journalism, we need not only revenue but also vision. Grubisich lays out one vision. The one challenge with these grand visions for local media is that editorially they stil need to be relevant in the communities that they serve.

Content metrics aren’t bad, measuring the wrong things is bad

City University London journalism professor George Brock has criticised Trinity-Mirror’s Newsroom 3.1 plan saying that their focus on metrics has been discredited. Metrics aren’t bad in and of themselves, but George is right to point out that volume metrics alone – clicks and unique users – aren’t enough.

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